Contact Info

One Campus Martius

Phone: 1-800-COMPUWARE

Web: compuware.com

About Mark Schettenhelm

Mark Schettenhelm, Product Manager for Compuware’s ISPW product, has more than 30 years of experience in the IT industry. Mark’s background is in Testing and Application Portfolio Analysis with his current focus being in Source Code Management. Mark has received the Certification of Information Privacy Professional (CIPP/US) from the International Association of Privacy Professionals, (IAPP). He has been interviewed in numerous publications including ZDNet UK, Application Development Trends and Storage Magazine, and has a regular column in Enterprise Tech Journal. In his 25 years with Compuware, Mark has been instrumental in helping to bring the Compuware mainframe solutions to the forefront of the industry. Mark’s efforts on matching customer needs and expectations with the functionality of various software and solutions have been extremely successful in helping the Company chart a path for the enterprise segment of the IT industry. Before joining Compuware Mark was a software developer in the health care industry. Mark is a native of Michigan and graduated from Northern Michigan University with a B.S. in History.

Compile Skeletons: Why Not Use the Best?

By | April 21st, 2016|Code Quality, DevOps|

As a Product Manager I’m constantly looking for the win-win option of something that provides flexibility with minimal complexity. Often this balance is only achieved by starting with the right philosophy and continually learning from customer experience.

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Exit Strategies: Why Not Use the Best?

By | March 28th, 2016|Agile Dev, COBOL, Code Quality, Data, DevOps|

Here at Compuware we converted from CA Endevor to ISPW for our Source Code Management (SCM). I noticed right away that ISPW used a superior way to implement exits. You simply go to a panel and select the exit you need to modify from a list of all available exits. This is important because there is no hunting around to find the exits—they are all listed.

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Balancing Complexity and Flexibility: Why Not Use the Best?

By | March 9th, 2016|Agile Dev, App Performance, Code Quality, DevOps|

Sometimes things like SCM products are naturally complex, but that complexity should be handled out of the view and participation of the user. The goal of a product should be what we’ve termed "elegant simplicity": a simple, intuitive and natural way to accomplish what needs to done.

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Data Access: Why Not Use the Best?

By | March 1st, 2016|Agile Dev, App Performance, Code Quality|

Having now used ISPW versus Endevor, you quickly appreciate the benefits of its modern architecture. You quickly begin to value the improvements in efficiency, performance and power you get with a database. And, you quickly come to the conclusion, why did I let myself fall into the day-to-day trap of tolerating the loss of productivity from a Source Code Management that is a prisoner of the past?

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Five Big Mistakes You Can Make with Big Data

By | October 6th, 2014|Data|

There's a lot of talk and hype about Big Data and with that comes confusion and mistakes. Here are five big mistakes you can make when starting a Big Data initiative. Ignore the source of your data. Don't pay attention to the origins of your data; it will just slow [...]

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Applications: What To Keep, What To Replace?

By | August 27th, 2014|Featured|

Credit: Joe + Jeanette Archie I was affected by the flooding that hit the Detroit area recently.  While cleaning out my basement I was struck by the amount of things I had—for no good reason. Let me explain. Many things I had, I had because they were given [...]

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Going Au Naturel: Comments as a Complexity Metric

By | June 24th, 2014|DevOps|

I’ve written a lot about metrics as a means to gauge the complexity of a program including SLOC and the Halstead and McCabe metrics. An often over looked metric – and one I haven’t touched on before – is one that’s in plain sight: comments Comments are added to programs [...]

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How to Know When Code is Complex, Part 3: Using the McCabe Complexity Metric

By | April 29th, 2014|COBOL|

The McCabe Complexity Metric, as discussed in my last post, relates to the number of decision points (points where the logic path splits) in a section of code.  When used along with the Halstead Metric, the McCabe Metric can help you objectively assess and compare the complexity of new programs [...]

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How to know when code is complex, Part 2: McCabe Complexity Metric

By | February 26th, 2014|DevOps|

In my last post I discussed code complexity and the advantages of breaking complex code into smaller blocks. But how can we judge the size of these blocks?  How can we quickly know the number of decisions in each block?  If we think in terms of the delicate balance in [...]

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How to know when code is complex

By | February 13th, 2014|COBOL|

“Any darn fool can make something complex; it takes a genius to make something simple.” This quote has been attributed to different people, from Albert Einstein to Pete Seeger. Whatever the origin, I think it really applies to code. When given a task to accomplish developers should all be able [...]

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How Hard Can it Be? Find Out with the Halstead Maintenance Effort Metric

By | September 10th, 2013|DevOps|

In a previous post I discussed Halstead Metrics as a good way to gain insight into the complexity of a program. Vocabulary and Length in particular get to the heart of what’s important in a program, but there are other calculations based on the Operands and Operators counts. Here are [...]

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